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Editors' Blog

Everglades forever!

emily

Over the past 100 years, a lot of damage has been caused to the Everglades - a region of sub-tropical wetlands in Florida.

Powerful pictures

emily

If you love photography and knowing more about what's happening in the world, head to SocialDocumentary.net and check out their online galleries.

Trains go green!

emily

Good news for the environment! Trains in Britain will soon be running on electric power instead of diesel.

Hope for the rhino

emily

The President of Indonesia declared the start of the International Year of the Rhino last month – and these amazing mammals will be happy to hear it!

National Geographic Kids magazine joins the fun!

Lauren

This month's edition of National Geographic Kids UK magazine has a story about the Children's Eyes On Earth Contest! 

REZA goes around the world!

Lauren

Photographer and Children's Eyes On Earth co-founder, REZA, is on a tour of 14 countries to find out more about how kids learn around the world!

Help save the Arctic!

Lauren

The Arctic (the ice-covered region at the very north of our planet) is home to amazing animals like polar bears and indigenous people including the Inuit, who have lived there for thousands of years. But, sadly, the Arctic is in danger, as companies want to drill for oil and fish the seas of this fragile environment.

Super seaweed!

Lauren

We all know the ocean is full of natural wonders, but who would have thought that seaweed could be used to clean your teeth?!

Good news for Africa’s animals!

Lauren

Last month, Gabon, in Central Africa, became the first African state to destroy their store of over four tonnes of ivory - and conservation organisation, WWF, are hoping that now many more countries will follow! 

Plant blooms after 25 years!

Lauren

A Mexican plant called Furcraea has flowered... after an incredible 25 years! The gardeners at Overbeck's House and Gardens in Devon, England, were surprised to see an unusual spike rising over three metres tall from the plant, covered with flowers and buds. It was the first time they had ever seen it bloom!

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